DENTAL BLOG

Open Enrollment | 7 Terms You Should Know for Dental Insurance

Open Enrollment | 7 Terms You Should Know for Dental Insurance

Open enrollment begins for millions of people across the country. Open enrollment allows people to purchase new health care plans or change their current coverage. There is a set enrollment period, and for most people this year, it’s November 1 through December 15. Dental insurance can be purchased at any time of year, but for a lot of people, open enrollment puts dental insurance top-of-mind as they’re researching the options that are available to them.  Dental insurance, for the most part, act as health care plans do. Let’s look into some important terms to gain a better understanding as you’re looking for dental insurance.   Deductible A deductible is the total amount you pay before the dental benefits carrier begins to pay for dental treatment costs. Once your deductible is met, insurance kicks in to help cover the costs. These deductibles can range from $25 annually to a one-time lifetime $100 deductible, and some plans don’t require a deductible at all.  Preventive, Basic & Major Coverage Once your deductible is taken care of, you can now look at dental insurance to cover three main categories: Preventive, Basic & Major. Preventive is typically covered at or near 100 percent. From there, basic and major coverages will vary per plan. We get into this with coinsurance below, but let’s take a look at what these three categories cover:  • Preventive coverage typically includes exams, cleanings, sealants and fluoride treatments.  • Basic coverage might include things like fillings, gum treatments, root canals and extractions.  • Major coverage usually includes bridges, implants and dentures. Coinsurance Now that we’ve defined the three major categories dental insurance covers, let’s dive into how coinsurance aligns with them. Coinsurance is the cost that you and the benefits carrier share. We mentioned above that preventive is usually covered at 100 percent. For basic coverages, you can expect to pay around 20 percent of the cost. For major services, you can expect to pay around 50 percent of the cost.  Some plans offer graduating percentages that increase by the year. Also called loyalty benefits, one such plan may cover 50 percent of the cost in the first year and increase to 65 percent the second year and 80 percent by the third year. Assessing your situation and what dental work you may need in the future will play a large part in which dental insurance you choose.  Annual Maximum The annual maximum your plan offers is the amount your carrier will pay per year. Unlike health insurance, for dental, once your maximum is met, the rest of the cost will be up to you to cover. If you’re planning for dental work in the future, here are some things to take into consideration to help lower the cost:  • Are you visiting in-network dentists to receive lower rates?  • Does your coinsurance increase the following year?  • Does your annual max increase as well?  People rarely hit their annual max unless they’re in need of major dental work. Finding the right plan that fits your time schedule is essential for getting the most value.  Waiting periods Most dental insurance plans require a waiting period for basic and major work. But some do not. When accidents happen, or pain hits from out of nowhere, some insurance plans offer no waiting periods for you to get in and get the work done that gets you on your way faster. Most of preventive care is taken care of right away. For basic and major procedures, research which plan fits with your needs.  Looking for an easy way to shop? Check out Direct Benefits Marketplace!  The Direct Benefits Marketplace makes it easy to compare dental insurance plans to ensure you pick the right one for you and your family. You can compare different policies side-by-side to clearly see what they have to offer, and you can get a better picture of what your out-of-pocket costs will be based on the level of coverage that’s provided by each insurer. Have questions? Our consumer advisors are standing by to answer the short questions and the long questions. They’re here to provide you with ultimate service and guidance.   

Preventive Dental Care is the Way to Go

Preventive Dental Care is the Way to Go

Some call it a journey. Some call it a chore. Some don’t think anything of it at all. Whatever you consider it, preventive dental care helps keep your teeth and gums healthy and lessens the risk for future oral issues.   Ever since you were little, you've been told to brush your teeth before going to bed. Little did you know then, this little routine would become the basis for your dental health as you grew older.   What’s at stake?  Our mouth is full of bacteria. Some good and some bad. The primary culprit of tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease that we’re worried about is the result of bacterial plaque: a thin film that forms on tooth surfaces from food particles.   You get rid of the bacterial plaque with preventive dental care. Here, the American Dental Association recommends:   Brushing teeth at least twice a day (preferably bookending the day) for two minutes with fluoride toothpaste Cleaning between your teeth (flossing) Drink water with fluoride Eat a healthy diet See your dentist regularly Practicing regular dental care early on carries numerous benefits. But it’s never too late to begin! Here are some helpful tips to keep you on the right path to better dental care.   Get into a routine  Acknowledging that developing a habit is difficult may be the first step in your journey to better dental care. Acknowledging this will put it at the forefront that there will be struggles at times, and that’s OK. The important thing to remember is to keep going.   Here are five ways to help develop a habit for better hygiene practices:   Set a schedule   Stay organized Have a visual reminder Reward yourself Practice mindfulness with dental hygiene   Maybe your issue is not flossing as much. Use your toothbrush as a “trigger.” When you reach for your toothbrush to brush your teeth, simply remember to floss, put down the toothbrush and begin flossing. It’s also helpful if you just think of flossing one tooth. Hey, one tooth, and you’re done! Or, maybe you really do have time to floss a few more.   What’s the big deal with fluoride anyway?   Fluoride is a mineral that occurs naturally, found in water, soil, plants, rocks and air. It’s also found in your bones and teeth. Dentists have found fluoride helps in the fight against tooth decay.   How does this work?  Let’s take the example of indulging in a sugary drink. If no dental care action occurs, the bacteria in your mouth will begin to break down the sugar, thus releasing acids that eat away at the minerals found in your tooth enamel. Introducing fluoride to the situation remineralizes your tooth enamel, which helps prevent cavities and reverse early signs of tooth decay.   Develop healthy eating habits  Eating healthy not only plays a role in overall health but dental care too. Candy causes cavities. Coffee stains teeth. Overdoing it with an acidic drink such as orange juice will even strip away at the enamel.   Developing a plan for what you’re going to eat for the day or week will help organize your food choices and lead you to make better decisions.   If you know you’re going to have a soft drink, try to drink it with a meal. When snack attack cravings occur when we’re unprepared, bad choices happen. Grocery shop specifically for healthy snack items and then prepare them in the mornings in case you need to grab and go.   Listen to your dentist  Visiting your dentist on an annual basis (at a minimum) not only allows for professionals to analyze your teeth and clean them but also gives you a chance to receive some expert advice on how to get better with dental care. Dentists will advise on topics such as:   Which toothbrush is best   Whitening options Lifestyle habits Types of toothpaste that would work well (sensitivity) Improvement areas with at home dental care practices   Dentists are there to clean and treat your teeth, and that’s what they’ll do. But they’re also there to help coach you on making better decisions and developing a plan that works for you.   At Direct Benefits, similarly, we’re here to guide you in any questions you may have with dental insurance. We believe that one size does not fit all, and there’s a plan out there designed specifically to meet your needs. Compare, select and protect with our dental insurance options.   Have questions? Our Customer Happiness team is standing by. Chat now!    Sources:  https://www.healthline.com/health/what-is-fluoride#benefits  https://www.ada.org/en/member-center/oral-health-topics/home-care  https://modeldental.com/instill-in-your-child-the-daily-habit-of-brushing-and-flossing/ 

Mindfulness with Dental Hygiene

Mindfulness with Dental Hygiene

These days, everyone deserves a break. But finding the time to take a break—all to yourself—can seem impossible. What if there was a way to take a break in real-time, while still being productive? Practicing mindfulness with dental hygiene does exactly that.   First off, what is mindfulness? Mindfulness is defined by Merriam Webster as, “The practice of maintaining a nonjudgmental state of heightened or complete awareness of one's thoughts, emotions, or experiences on a moment-to-moment basis.” Sound intimidating? Trust us, it’s not. It’s simple and like everything else, it takes practice to get better.   Health benefits of Mindfulness & Dental Hygiene  Dentists recommend brushing your teeth for two minutes, flossing regularly and using mouthwash when appropriate. This equates to about 4-5 minutes bookending the day for dental hygiene practices. When you combine dental hygiene with mindfulness, this becomes a potent 8-10 minutes per day to recharge yourself and feel better.   Dental hygiene health benefits  May help to prevent heart disease & stroke Strengthens your immune system Regulates blood pressure  Mindfulness health benefits  Reduces stress Controls anxiety Promotes emotional health Improves sleep Can decrease blood pressure Mindfulness with dental hygiene in action  Start out by relaxing your neck and face. Breathe deep. Feel the cool air enter through your nostrils and fill your lungs. Exhale. Calmly, pick up your toothbrush. Take another deep breath. Relieve your thoughts so you’re in the present moment. Notice the noise the water makes when it’s turned on. Brush your teeth purposefully in a controlled manner. Whatever is waiting for you when you are finished can wait four minutes longer. Breathe deep. Relax.   Once mindful brushing is complete, you should feel calm and collected. If you don’t, it’s alright. Soon, you’ll see dental hygiene as an additional benefit for yourself, rather than just another thing you have to get to.   Get ready for your day | Prepare for sleep  We’ve always been told to eat a good breakfast to start the day right. It can also be said that collecting yourself before you head out for your day is also beneficial. Imagine starting your day with a clear perspective of what needs to be accomplished—putting aside the distractions to think effectively. Being mindful helps organize your thoughts to tackle what’s important.   Similarly going to bed feeling relaxed improves sleep. Giving yourself the opportunity to clear your mind and reset, even if it’s just for five minutes, will help you relax and ease into your dreams.    Feeling peace of mind with dental insurance  Dental insurance eases your worries when something bad happens. Preventative care covered at 100% will keep your teeth cleaned and avoids issues down the road. The Direct Benefits Marketplace allows you to compare, bundle, ask questions, and read over more material; we’re here for you.   Also, have you ever wondered what the American Dental Association says on the proper brushing technique?   1. Place your toothbrush at a 45-degree angle to the gums.  2. Gently move the brush back and forth in short (tooth-wide) strokes.  3. Brush the outer surfaces, the inner surfaces, and the chewing surfaces of the teeth. 4. To clean the inside surfaces of the front teeth, tilt the brush vertically and make several up-and-down strokes.    Sources:  https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/11264-oral-health--risk-for-cv-disease  https://drania.com/better-oral-health-can-boost-your-immune-system/  https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/12-benefits-of-meditation#TOC_TITLE_HDR_12  https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/21/well/mind/how-to-be-mindful-while-brushing-your-teeth.html  https://www.ada.org/sitecore/content/home-mouthhealthy/az-topics/b/brushing-your-teeth       

Smile! Back to School with Healthy Teeth

Smile! Back to School with Healthy Teeth

The first day of school brings so many emotions for everyone involved. The children going to primary school are thrilled to see their friends. The teenagers going to high school are nervous about everything. The parents are happy to have the kids back in a routine. And the young-adult off to college is happy to be away from home. Covid-19 is here, and we’re all adjusting and finding a new normal. However you’re going back to school this year, healthy teeth still play an integral role in delivering confidence for that first day. Let’s dive in to see how. Fresh breath By now, we all realize a mask has put our bad breath on notice; first-period desk mates rejoice. And people are responding by brushing their teeth more. There are plenty of causes for bad breath to watch out for: Poor hygiene   Garlic, onion, and dairy products Dry mouth Sinus infections Braces with hard to reach spaces to clean   And while brushing your teeth carries positive hygiene impacts, the fresh breath you also receive allows you to think about the task at hand more clearly. Whether that’s talking to a potential new best friend, or learning about 18th century literature, fresh breath will keep you focused and not distracted. Mouth appearance Social awareness, depending on where you are in the school system, ranges from zero concern wearing your favorite cartoon t-shirt, to spending an hour-minimum getting ready for the day. Neither is wrong, but appearance can trigger a lot of emotions. Some kids cannot keep up with dental hygiene resulting in a negative body image. This leads to self-esteem issues, anxiety and depression. Avoid this with healthy teeth: work to develop a routine of self-dental care and keep up with regular dentist checkups. Stay positive Let’s be honest—it’s hard to be happy if your tooth hurts. And if your tooth hurts, you’re probably not paying attention when the teacher calls on you to spell D-R-A-G-O-N. For the first day of school, you want to be on your best behavior and not have to worry about your teeth. The domino effect of having healthy teeth provides positivity for your mind-set and for your overall health. Dental insurance for you Depending on your situation, there’s a dental plan for you. Maybe you’re wondering how much dental care will cost, or which plan is right for you and your family. The Direct Benefits Marketplace simplifies the process by allowing you to compare various plans that are available in your area. Our customer happiness team is also here to answer any questions you have. So have a great first day of school, and make sure your teeth aren’t holding you back! Sources: https://patient.info/news-and-features/how-your-teeth-can-affect-your-self-esteem https://www.dentalhealth.org/healthysmile

How Much Does a Dental Crown Cost?

How Much Does a Dental Crown Cost?

Updated March 2022 When your dentist tells you that one of your teeth is severely damaged—perhaps from an injury or extensive decay that can’t be fixed with a filling—getting a dental crown might be the best way to restore it. Don’t worry, the crown will be durable and will look just like a real tooth. Plus, you can care for it by simply brushing, flossing, and seeing your dentist for cleanings. It’s easy to see why crowns are so popular. But if you’re interested in this restorative treatment, you might be wondering what the average cost of a tooth crown would be.   How much does a dental crown cost without insurance? First, let’s talk about the average cost of a dental crown when you need to pay for it all out of pocket because you don’t have insurance. Generally, the cost might be anywhere from $500 to $3,000 or more for a crown.  However, the price will vary based on several factors, such as the dental professional you use and where they’re located, the material that’s used to make the crown, and the tooth that the crown is restoring (e.g., front tooth crown cost may differ from a back tooth crown).    Your dentist can tell you about the pros and cons of different crowns and help you decide which one is right for you. So, let’s take a look at the types of dental crowns and their cost: Porcelain or ceramic The nice thing about going with a porcelain or ceramic crown is that it will look natural in your mouth and blend in well with your other teeth.  This type of crown might cost, on average, anywhere from $800 to $3,000.  Porcelain fused to metal You might be able to save money if you go with a porcelain fused to metal crown rather than a porcelain one. Although this is durable, one drawback is it might cause a gray line along your gums.  This type of crown might cost, on average, $500 to $1,500.   Metal or gold A dental crown could also be made of metals, such as chromium, nickel, or gold. If you want a durable option, this may be a good way to go, but keep in mind that it won’t have the color of a natural tooth.  The average metal or gold crown tooth cost might be anywhere from $600 to $2,500.    Zirconia If you’d prefer a crown that combines metal’s durability with the look of porcelain, zirconium may give you exactly what you want.  Like a porcelain crown, this type might cost $800 to $3,000, on average.    Note: When you get a dental crown, you’ll need to see your dentist more than once. The process involves multiple steps, such as preparing the tooth, taking an impression for the crown to be made, applying a temporary crown, and placing the permanent crown while ensuring the fit is right. Sometimes, other procedures, such as minor gum surgery, might be necessary too. If you don’t have dental insurance, you may need to cover additional fees for things like exams, X-rays, and procedures before and after the crown is set in place—and those can certainly add up fast.    How much does a tooth crown cost with insurance? The amount of money you’ll be able to save on a dental crown with the help of insurance will depend on the plan you’re enrolled in and other factors.  Example: if a dental crown is categorized as a major service, you might be able to save 50%. In other words, if a crown would cost $2,000 without insurance, you might only need to pay $1,000 with the help of insurance.  Consider things like the cost of using an out-of-network dentist versus one that’s in-network. Also, check the copay, deductible, coinsurance, and annual maximum, as well as other restrictions and exclusions, to calculate how much you’d potentially save. Some plans may provide more coverage than others, and some might only cover crowns that are medically necessary rather than cosmetic. How long do dental crowns last? What about dental crown replacement cost? Sure, a good quality crown may last many years, but it might need to be replaced eventually simply because of age or damage. How much would that cost? Generally, the price is the same whether you’re getting a crown for the first time or replacing it with a new one.  Tip: Read the details of your dental plan carefully to see if there are any limits on coverage for replacement dental crowns. For example, an insurer might require that you wait a certain amount of time to become eligible for a replacement crown.  Is it worth getting a tooth crown?  Yes! Dental crowns are commonly used to restore teeth. If you need a root canal, your tooth is cracked, or you want to get a dental implant to replace a missing tooth, a crown can be a great solution. And if you take good care of your crown, it might last upwards of 15 years.    Reduce your dental crown cost with insurance   Once you know the benefits of getting a custom dental crown, you’ll begin to understand why it comes at such a hefty price. Thankfully, the right insurance may give you access to low cost dental crowns, so it’s worth checking the plans available in your area with the help of the Direct Benefits Marketplace. Browse the policies that are within your budget and see how much support they’d provide if you were ever in need of a crown.      Sources: https://www.byteme.com/community/resources/article/cost-of-crowns/ https://oceanbreezeprosthodontics.com/blog/types-of-dental-crowns-and-cost-a-complete-guide-2021/ https://www.finestdentistry.com/how-much-does-dental-crown-cost/ https://lakemoordental.com/cost-of-dental-crown-price https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/dental-crowns#091e9c5e80007b91-4-9 https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/treatments/10923-dental-crowns

Invisalign Insurance Coverage & Cost

Invisalign Insurance Coverage & Cost

Updated May 2022 What are the advantages of Invisalign? If you have a less complex case of misaligned teeth, your dentist may suggest Invisalign treatment as an option. Invisalign offers a lot of benefits that make it a more attractive option than traditional braces including:   Less trips to the orthodontist throughout the treatment period  Ability to remove your aligners for several hours at a time No food or drink restrictions More subtle appearance vs traditional braces In many cases, less time needed to straighten your teeth vs traditional braces However, Invisalign treatment can be expensive so it is important to consider the cost and whether or not insurance can help cover expenses.  Does insurance cover Invisalign? Yes, you can find dental insurance that covers Invisalign. This means you have options that can help reduce your out-of-pocket costs.  Coverage amounts vary between plans. Typically, insurers cover a percentage of the cost of orthodontics. Also, keep in mind that some policies might only cover orthodontics if they’re medically necessary, so they might exclude Invisalign if it’s considered a cosmetic treatment.  Note: If you have a dental plan that covers regular braces, your insurer might cover Invisalign the same way. Just confirm that Invisalign, in particular, is included.  Invisalign cost with vs without insurance How much is Invisalign without insurance?  The amount you’ll pay will depend on various factors, which are covered below. On average, the cost of Invisalign might be $3,000 to $8,000. If you don’t have insurance, you’ll be responsible for the entire bill.   How much does Invisalign cost with insurance? If you have insurance, your provider might cover a portion of the cost of Invisalign, such as 25-50%, and this might help you save hundreds or thousands. As an example, if your insurance were to cover half of the cost of a $6,000 bill, you’d only need to pay $3,000.   Note: Insurance plans might impose limits on coverage and other restrictions, such as annual maximums, waiting periods, and lifetime maximums. You might also be responsible for a copay, coinsurance, and/or deductible when you receive orthodontic care, and these fees will vary from one policy to the next.  Factors that can affect the cost of Invisalign What can affect the cost of Invisalign? Several factors can have an impact, such as where you’re located, the orthodontist you use, and the following:  Severity of the misalignment  The more severe and complex your condition, the more expensive your Invisalign treatment will be.  For example, treatment for a minor misalignment might cost less than $3,000 and might only take a few months. But if the misalignment of your bite or teeth is severe, the cost might be closer to $5,000 or more and the treatment will likely take longer.  The teeth that are treated and the number of trays you need Another factor that can impact the cost is whether you need to straighten just your bottom or top teeth or you need to straighten both. If you need aligners for your whole mouth, the cost will be higher.   Also, the number of trays you’ll need will depend on how mild or severe your condition is. On average, people might need 20-30 trays, but you may need more or less, and this will play a role in your total cost.  Treatments needed before, during, and after Invisalign  Before you get your first Invisalign tray, your orthodontist will examine your mouth and might need to take X-rays. Also, if your teeth or gums aren’t as healthy as they should be, you might need to undergo treatments to get them in tip-top shape. And if you need other treatments, such as extractions, those will increase the total cost. Plus, after you’ve completed your treatment, you may need to get a retainer to maintain the results.  Having comprehensive insurance can help you save in many or all of these areas. High-quality plans may cover exams, extractions, fillings, and other treatments you might need before, during, and after Invisalign. Can’t afford Invisalign? You have other options If Invisalign is too pricey, consider discussing other options with your orthodontist. There are other brands that offer clear aligners, such as ClearCorrect, SmileDirectClub, SnapCorrect, and Byte. These might be priced within your budget, and your insurer might help cover some of the cost too.  Shop for Invisalign insurance on Direct Benefits Marketplace Now that you have a better understanding of the cost of Invisalign and you know that you can reduce the cost of Invisalign with insurance, it’s time to start your search for the perfect dental plan.  What insurance covers Invisalign in your area, and how can you find it quickly and easily? Check out the Direct Benefits Marketplace to compare options and enroll in the policy that’s just right for your needs and budget.

How Much Does Wisdom Teeth Removal Cost With or Without Insurance?

How Much Does Wisdom Teeth Removal Cost With or Without Insurance?

Updated March 2022 The four wisdom teeth are found all the way in the back of your mouth. They’re the last ones to erupt, typically by your late teens or early 20s. But the sad reality is that many people end up having problems, such as infections or impactions, with these chompers.   Sometimes, the only solution is to extract one or more wisdom teeth to restore your oral health. There are a lot of things to think about if you need to have your wisdom teeth pulled, and one of them is the cost.  How much does it cost to extract wisdom teeth? Believe it or not, the price can be surprisingly high. So, let’s dive into the average cost of wisdom teeth removal so you can get a better idea of what to expect.     How much does wisdom teeth removal cost without insurance? If you don’t have dental insurance and need to undergo wisdom tooth extraction, you’ll be responsible for paying the entire bill on your own.  The amount that you’ll have to pay will depend on various factors, such as the dental professional you use, where you’re receiving care, and whether you’ll be sedated during the procedure. Also, if your tooth is impacted or it has grown at an angle rather than straight, the cost will be higher.  A simple extraction might cost anywhere from $75 to $200, on average, for one wisdom tooth.   A surgical extraction might cost anywhere from $225 to $1,100, on average, for one wisdom tooth, and it depends on the impaction.     Cost to pull wisdom teeth based on impaction The worse the impaction, the higher the extraction price because the procedure becomes more complicated and riskier. Also, if you have an impacted wisdom tooth, you may need to go to a specialist or oral surgeon to have it removed, and that may increase the cost. On the other hand, if you have a wisdom tooth that has erupted normally but it needs to be pulled, your dentist might be able to perform a simple extraction with local anesthesia.     Here’s a breakdown of the average costs of removing impacted wisdom teeth: Soft tissue impaction If a wisdom tooth is still covered by gum tissue, removing it will require an incision that will complicate the extraction. You might also end up needing more anesthesia than you would with a simple extraction, and you may need stitches too. All of this drives up the cost.  On average, you might need to pay anywhere from $225 to $850 for a soft tissue impaction. The overall average is around $350.   Partial bony impaction With a partial bony impaction, the wisdom tooth didn’t erupt completely from the jawbone. This means that an incision will need to be made into the gums and the oral surgeon will need to get through the bone that’s covering the tooth as well. This will be even more complicated and require more time. General anesthesia or sedation may also be necessary. On average, the cost of removing a wisdom tooth with a partially bony impaction might be anywhere from $300 to $950. The overall average is around $450.     Full bony impaction The most severe impaction is the full bony impaction, which means the tooth is still in the jawbone, perhaps even on its side horizontally. The oral surgeon will need to get through the gums and the bone that surrounds the tooth, perhaps even breaking the tooth into pieces to remove it more easily. Therefore, this extraction is the most complex, and you may need to be unconscious during this procedure with general anesthesia.    On average, the cost to extract a wisdom tooth with a full bony impaction might be anywhere from $350 to $1,100. The overall average is around $550.    How much does it cost to remove all wisdom teeth? If your dentist has recommended that you remove all four wisdom teeth at the same time, you might be able to save a bit of money. But, again, the cost will depend on factors like the type of impaction of each tooth.   Here’s a breakdown of how much you might spend to have all of your wisdom teeth extracted:   Wisdom teeth that have fully erupted and need simple extractions might cost anywhere from $300 to $800, on average.    Wisdom teeth with soft tissue impaction might cost anywhere from $800 to $1,500, on average.    Wisdom teeth that show a bony impaction might cost anywhere from $1,000 to $1,800, on average.    Other fees that might be added to the cost of having wisdom teeth pulled The cost of the extraction is one thing, but you may also need to cover additional fees, such as:   Exam fees: $50 to $200, on average   Panoramic X-rays: $100 to $250, on average   Sedation: $100 to $500, on average    Does insurance cover wisdom teeth removal? How much does it cost to remove wisdom teeth with insurance? The amount of money you can save with the help of insurance will depend on the coverage provided by your plan. You could potentially save hundreds of dollars if your insurance will cover a percentage of the cost, such as 80% or 50%.   To be clear on how much you’ll owe versus how much your insurance will pay, check the details of the plan carefully, including the copay, deductible, and coinsurance. There might be restrictions or limitations on coverage too, and the annual maximum should be considered.  Talk to your dentist or oral surgeon about how you can reduce your wisdom teeth removal cost with insurance. If you need to have more than one tooth pulled, for example, you might be able to space out the extractions so you won’t exceed your plan’s annual maximum.    The right dental plan can help cover the cost to have wisdom teeth removed Do you want greater peace of mind when it comes to affording dental care? Consider enrolling in comprehensive dental insurance. This simple step can help you save a lot of money, especially when it comes to impacted wisdom teeth removal. To start your search for the ideal dental insurance, check out the Direct Benefits Marketplace, where you can easily compare the options available in your area and sign up whenever you’re ready.       Sources: https://www.katycypressoralsurgery.com/how-much-does-wisdom-teeth-removal-cost/ https://www.newmouth.com/blog/wisdom-teeth-removal-cost/ https://www.finestdentistry.com/how-much-does-wisdom-teeth-removal-cost/ https://www.highlandoakdental.com/how-much-does-wisdom-teeth-removal-cost/

How Much Does a Root Canal Cost With or Without Insurance?

How Much Does a Root Canal Cost With or Without Insurance?

Updated March 2022 Being told that you need a root canal is definitely a bummer. But the truth is this procedure can fix a severely damaged or decayed tooth so you won’t need to extract it. So, it can’t be all that bad, right?  Basically, during a root canal, a dentist or endodontist (a specialist in root canals) will remove the pulp that’s inside your tooth. By cleaning out all of the decay and infection, the tooth can be filled and sealed. Then, a crown that looks like a natural tooth may be set in place.  Now that we’ve covered the basics of what a root canal is, let’s discuss another frequently asked question: what is the average cost of a root canal? Below, we break down root canal cost with insurance vs. root canal cost without insurance.   Why does a root canal cost so much? Unfortunately, root canals are not cheap. You might be shocked by the average cost of a root canal, especially if you need to pay for it all out of pocket because you don’t have insurance.   You might need to see your dentist multiple times, including before and after the actual treatment. Also, X-rays may need to be taken, and you might be prescribed medications, such as antibiotics and painkillers. Plus, the procedure involves anesthesia to help keep you comfortable, and you might need to purchase a crown that will restore the look of the tooth. It all adds up!  Factors that can affect the cost of a root canal The total price will depend on factors like which tooth is being treated, which dental professional you’re using, where you’re located, whether or not you’ll be sedated, and if it’s an emergency root canal.  How much is a root canal without insurance? When you don’t have a good dental plan to help you cover the cost of a root canal and crown, you’ll need to pay the entire bill out of pocket.   As mentioned above, the cost of a root canal can be determined by the tooth that’s worked on. Here’s a breakdown to give you an idea of some average prices: Front tooth: $600 to $900, on average Bicuspid (premolar): $700 to $1,000, on average Molar: $1,000 to $1,400, on average  A dental crown may be used to restore the tooth, so don’t forget to include its cost. Depending on factors like the type of crown you get, you might spend anywhere from $500 to $3,000, on average.   If sedation will be necessary, the cost will depend on the type that’s used, as well as other factors. For example, inhalation sedation might cost upwards of $100, while oral sedation might be as high as $500 and general anesthesia might be as much as $1,000.      How much does a root canal cost with insurance? The cost of a root canal with insurance will depend on your dental plan. Insurers might cover a percentage of the cost, such as 80% or 50% based on whether the procedure is classified as a basic or major service. You’d be responsible for the balance.   Example: if you need a root canal that will cost $1,200, you might only need to pay $240 if your insurer covers 80% of the bill. If your plan covers root canals at 50%, you’d pay $600. Those are substantial savings! A superb dental plan may help cover the cost of the root canal, crown, and appointments and treatments you might need before and after the procedure. But keep in mind that policies might have exclusions, restrictions, copays, deductibles, and annual maximums that could affect how much will be covered.   Is a root canal worth it? A root canal might be scary, but it can help you keep your tooth. Also, if a tooth is badly infected, you don’t want to risk the infection making its way to other parts of your body.  Put simply, if a root canal is the best or only treatment option, it’s certainly worth it, as it can prevent an existing problem from getting worse.  Dental insurance can help reduce your root canal treatment cost Needing a root canal is stressful enough without worrying about how you’ll pay for it all out of pocket. With the right dental plan in place, you could save a lot, so if you don’t already have insurance, consider looking into the options available in your area.  The Direct Benefits Marketplace makes comparing dental plans quick and simple. Start your search today for a policy that can help you save money when you need to undergo an expensive dental procedure.    Sources: https://www.valuepenguin.com/average-cost-root-canal https://www.newmouth.com/blog/root-canal-without-insurance/ https://teethtalkgirl.com/videos/how-much-does-a-root-canal-cost https://health.costhelper.com/dental-sedation.html

Does Dental Insurance Cover Braces?

Does Dental Insurance Cover Braces?

Updated May 2022 Braces can do more than straighten misaligned teeth and help you get the beautiful smile you want. If you’ve been diagnosed with malocclusion—misalignment of your bite, such as an overbite, underbite, crossbite, or open bite—an orthodontist can recommend the appropriate treatment to resolve the problem.   Unfortunately, braces aren’t cheap. And because you typically have to wear them for a long time (two years is the average), the costs can add up. Prices vary based on factors like the types of braces you need and how severe your condition is. On average, metal braces might cost anywhere from $3,000 to $7,000, while ceramic braces might be $4,000 to $8,000, and Invisalign might cost $3,000 to $8,000. Ouch! You know that dental insurance can help you save on everything from cleanings to implants, but are braces covered by insurance? The brief guide below covers braces insurance for kids and adults.  Yes, you can get dental insurance that covers braces If you’re worried about affording braces, the great news is you can find dental plans that cover orthodontics, and you might be surprised by how affordable they are.  With the right type of insurance, you can save a lot of money while getting top quality orthodontic care. However, not all plans cover orthodontics, so check the details carefully when shopping for dental insurance. What do orthodontic insurance plans offer? Coverage varies from one dental plan to the next, even when it comes to braces. As you browse the policies that cover orthodontics, you may notice that there are different levels of coverage for different types of orthodontic appliances. Or, you might only be able to get support for specific types of braces. But if an insurer will cover even just a percentage of the cost, you might be able to save hundreds or thousands of dollars when everything is said and done.  Dental insurance for orthodontics for kids Whether your child’s bite is misaligned or the teeth are too spaced out or overlapping, braces may be the solution. That’s why choosing an insurance plan that includes coverage for orthodontics for kids is a smart move.  Just be sure to read the details carefully, as some plans impose limits on coverage, and some might even restrict coverage based on whether or not the braces are medically necessary (e.g., your child has trouble chewing).   What about orthodontic insurance for adults? If you never got braces when you were younger and you’re ready to improve your bite or smile, you can find plans that cover orthodontics for adults. Again, just beware of coverage restrictions. For instance, braces might not be covered if you want them solely for cosmetic reasons.   Note: When shopping for dental insurance that covers braces, you might come across plans that cover orthodontics only for kids and teens. So, if you need braces as an adult, be sure to look for plans that specify they’ll provide this type of coverage.  What to look for in dental insurance that covers braces Once you start looking into the dental plans that cover braces, you might feel a little overwhelmed by your options. To narrow them down to those that are right for you, consider the following: Out-of-pocket costs In addition to the monthly premium, you might be responsible for other fees, such as copays, deductibles, and coinsurance. Also, if the insurance only covers a portion of the cost of orthodontics, such as 50%, you’ll be responsible for the rest.   Limits, restrictions, and exclusions Check details like annual maximums, lifetime maximums, and other coverage limits that can affect how much you’ll be responsible for.   Types of orthodontics covered There might be varying levels of coverage for the many types of braces. For example, if you really want to go with Invisalign or ceramic braces, read the fine print to be sure those are covered. Waiting periods Some insurance policies come with waiting periods you need to complete before becoming eligible for coverage. This can impact how soon you can get braces after you enroll in a policy.  In-network vs. out-of-network orthodontists If there’s a particular orthodontist you’d like to use, confirm that they’re in-network with a plan you’re considering. While some plans provide support if you see an out-of-network provider, you likely won’t save as much. Other treatment coverage In addition to the cost of the braces, there will be other fees to consider, such as the cost of exams and any other treatments that might be needed. The more your insurance will cover, the better.  How to find an orthodontic insurance plan that covers braces Whether you need orthodontics coverage for your kids or teens or you hope to find dental insurance that covers braces for adults, the Direct Benefits Marketplace can simplify the process. Compare the plans available in your area to see which ones offer the most comprehensive coverage. Then, start the enrollment process whenever you’re ready. Before you know it, you’ll have insurance that can help you improve your smile without breaking the bank. 

Dental Insurance That Covers Implants

Dental Insurance That Covers Implants

Updated June 2022 When you need to replace one or more teeth, your dentist might recommend dental implants. Unlike dentures that you need to take out of your mouth to clean, a dental implant will be set permanently in your jaw, so it will be like having a real tooth. You’ll be able to chew and speak normally, and you’ll be able to brush and floss like you’ve always done.  One downside to getting a dental implant, however, is the cost. If you’re on a tight budget and need to pay for an implant totally out of pocket, you might be reluctant to undergo this procedure.  Are dental implants covered by insurance? You can certainly find dental insurance that covers implants, but it’s important to keep in mind that not all dental plans cover this procedure. For example, some insurers categorize implants as a cosmetic procedure and, therefore, provide little to no support.  Even if you find a plan that includes implants, it’s wise to look at the fine print so you’ll know exactly what you’re getting. There are multiple steps involved in placing an implant, from the exam and X-rays to the procedure, implant, and crown. Plus, if you need to undergo a treatment (e.g., a bone graft or tooth extraction) to prepare your mouth for an implant, you’ll need to consider the cost of that too.  Note: Your medical insurance might help cover the cost of a dental implant in certain cases, such as when it’s medically necessary. And, depending on the reason for the implant, you might even be able to get help from both your medical and dental insurance policies.  Full coverage dental insurance plans Signing up for a full coverage dental plan might be the best way to get the most support when paying for dental implants. This type of policy typically helps cover the cost of preventive care, basic services, and major services.    Limits on dental implant insurance coverage Getting dental implants with insurance can help you save money, but there might be limitations on how much the insurer will pay.  One thing to watch out for is a missing tooth clause. Some insurers won’t cover a dental implant to replace a tooth that was lost before the policy took effect.    Another thing to consider is the percentage of the cost that the insurer will cover. For example, if implants are deemed a major service that’s covered at 50%, you’ll be responsible for the balance.   Look for the out-of-pocket costs (e.g., copays, deductibles, coinsurance) that you’ll be responsible for. And keep in mind that your plan’s annual maximum can limit the amount of money the insurer will spend on your care.  Remember, dental implant procedures involve multiple appointments, during which your dentist will prepare your mouth, insert the implant and crown, and ensure your mouth heals properly. It can all add up fast. How to get dental implants covered by insurance Many dental insurance companies offer plans that cover implants. However, the coverage amounts vary, with some plans offering much more than others.  It’s wise to shop around and carefully compare dental implant insurance plans before deciding on the one that fits your needs and budget. You can do so easily by visiting the Direct Benefits Marketplace and searching for policies that are available in your area.  Implants vs dentures coverage There are pros and cons to weigh when it comes to dental implants and dentures, as well as implant-supported dentures. Your dentist can help you decide which solution is best for you based on your needs and preferences.  No matter which treatment you choose, having the right insurance can help you save and give you peace of mind. But, again, not all plans will cover these treatments, so be sure to read the details carefully before enrolling.  Common questions about dental implants insurance coverage   What are dental implants?  A dental implant looks like a small screw, and your dentist will put it into your jaw during a surgical procedure. An abutment is then placed on top of the implant, followed by a custom crown that will look, feel, and function like a natural tooth.  The whole procedure is done in stages, so it can take time, but once you have your implant, it will be long-lasting if you take good care of it.  How much do dental implants cost? Dental implants can cost thousands. Here are some average prices to give you an idea of what you might need to pay out of pocket if you don’t have insurance: A single implant to replace one tooth might cost $1,500 to $6,000.  If you need to replace up to four teeth, it might cost upwards of $10,000.  Full mouth implants might cost over $34,000.  Keep in mind that the final cost will depend on factors like the type of implant and crown, whether you need any other treatments, and the dental professional you use.

Is Dental Insurance Worth It?

Is Dental Insurance Worth It?

Updated May 2022 It’s no secret that you have a lot to consider when it comes to insurance. But while you might not think twice about things like health insurance and car insurance, you might ask yourself: do I need dental insurance, and should I get dental insurance right away?  Like any other type of coverage, dental insurance can give you peace of mind, and you might be surprised by how much you can save.  Why is dental insurance important?  Even if you don’t have symptoms, it’s wise to see a dentist regularly for checkups and cleanings. But here’s the thing: even basic preventive care can add up fast. And if you ever do need a pricey filling, extraction, or root canal, you’ll be glad you had insurance to help you save money.  Should I get dental insurance? One way to determine if you should get dental coverage is by calculating your out-of-pocket costs and comparing them to what you’d pay if you had insurance.   But what’s the average dental insurance cost, and how much does dental insurance cover?  Well, the nice thing about this type of insurance is it can be super affordable, yet it covers a lot. You might be able to enroll in a comprehensive plan for $50 or less per month.   Monthly premiums vary based on your location and the provider and plan you select. Also, some policies cover more than others. Generally, though, you can get support in the following categories: preventive care, basic services, and major services. Certain plans will even cover orthodontics.   How much does dental insurance cover? Dental insurance can help in the following ways: Preventive care might be covered at 100%, so you won’t need to worry about paying for things like exams, X-rays, cleanings, etc.  Basic services might be covered at 70-80%. Depending on the insurer, this might include gum treatments, fillings, extractions, and more.  Major services might be covered at 50%. Depending on the insurer, this might include root canals, crowns, bridges, dentures, and implants. Orthodontics might be partially covered, such as up to 50%, if you need braces or orthodontic appliances. This might be limited to kids and teens, but some plans will cover adult orthodontics too.   Cosmetic procedures like veneers might be covered by some dental plans. Others might only cover these if they’re medically necessary.     How much would you pay without dental insurance? Dental care prices vary based on factors like where you receive care. But, to help put things in perspective and give you an idea of how much you could potentially save with the help of dental insurance, here are some average prices: Dental exams, X-rays, and cleanings might cost hundreds. An exam and X-rays might each cost $100 or more, and a cleaning might be anywhere from $70-200, on average.  Fillings for cavities can be pricey, but what you’ll pay will depend on the tooth being treated and the type of filling you get. Amalgam fillings might cost $50-150, on average. Composite fillings might cost $90-250, on average.  Root canals can be expensive too, and factors like the tooth being treated may affect the price. A root canal on a front tooth might cost $300-1,500, a premolar might cost $400-1,800, and a molar might cost $500-2,000, on average.  Dental crowns might cost $500-3,000, on average, with factors like the material they’re made of affecting the price.  Extractions might cost hundreds, and the price will be higher if you need multiple teeth pulled. While non-surgical extractions might cost upwards of $300, surgical extractions might be $600 or more, on average. Wisdom tooth extractions can be even more expensive, potentially costing thousands, especially if there’s a severe impaction.  Bridges, dentures, and implants that are used to replace missing teeth might cost thousands of dollars.    What are the types of dental plans you can choose from? There are several types of dental plans you can choose from to ensure you get the coverage you need at a price you can afford. Here’s a basic breakdown of your main options: Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) This is a good option when you want more freedom to choose your dentist. Using an in-network dentist will likely help you save the most money, but you may also receive some support if you see an out-of-network provider. Plus, you might not need to get referrals to specialists. However, these plans tend to be more expensive, and it’s important to be aware of the out-of-pocket costs, such as copays, coinsurance, and deductibles. Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) HMO dental plans tend to be less expensive, and you might not have to worry about deductibles. However, you’ll likely need to stay in-network to receive benefits (emergencies might be an exception). This means that, if you end up seeing an out-of-network dentist, you may not get any help at all. Also, these plans may require that you get a referral to see a specialist. And, unlike PPOs, you might need to select a PCP.   Indemnity  Also known as fee-for-service, an indemnity dental plan lets you choose any dentist, so this can be a great choice if you don’t want to deal with networks. The plan will reimburse you up to a certain percentage for covered dental care services. Out-of-pocket costs might include a premium and deductible.  What should you consider when shopping for the right dental plan? Honing in on the following might help you select the ideal policy more easily: Out-of-pocket fees – These include the monthly premium, as well as copays, deductibles, and coinsurance. Also, if a service is covered up to a certain amount, you’ll be responsible for the balance.  Annual and lifetime maximums – There might be a limit on the amount of money an insurer will pay. Once the limit is reached, you’ll be responsible for paying the rest.  Services that aren’t covered – Some services might not be covered at all. In that case, you’d need to pay for them completely out of pocket.  Waiting periods – Some insurers impose waiting periods that vary in length. Until you’ve completed a waiting period, you won’t be eligible for certain benefits, if any. If you don’t want this, there are dental plans without waiting periods.  Pre-existing condition exclusions – Some plans might not cover pre-existing conditions, so check the details to see if you’ll be able to receive the support you need. Emergency coverage – A plan should outline what will be covered if you need emergency care.  Networks – Consider the quality of the provider network. If you want to stick with a dentist you’ve been using, figure out if they’re in-network before enrolling in a plan.  Don’t wait to buy dental insurance  When it comes to dental insurance, having it in place in advance is best. Waiting until you need expensive care isn’t a smart move because you might run into restrictions like waiting periods or pre-existing condition exclusions. Plus, delaying treatment might cause a problem to worsen quickly.  How much is dental insurance in your area, and what types of plans are available? Browse the Direct Benefits Marketplace to find the perfect policy and start the enrollment process as soon as you’re ready.

Is Your Jaw Clicking? Here are Some Causes

Is Your Jaw Clicking? Here are Some Causes

Has your jaw been clicking or popping? Are you wondering why? We’ve got you covered with some information below that might help you figure out what’s going on. Continue reading to learn more, but keep in mind: seeing your dentist is the best way to get an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment to resolve any issues you’ve having with your jaw. First, We Need to Talk About TMD TMD is short for temporomandibular joint disorder and can also be referred to as TMJ. You might have heard of it, but you might not know exactly what it is. Put simply, TMD is a condition that affects the temporomandibular joint. That’s the hinge on either side of your face that connects your jaw to your skull. When you open and close your mouth, it’s this jaw that works, and it also allows you to move your jaw backward and forward, as well as side to side. Want to find this joint? Place your fingers in front of your ears and open and close your mouth. Feel it? Neat, right? So, when you have TMD, a problem arises within this complex and important joint, causing symptoms like discomfort, pain, clicking, or popping. And the disorder can make it difficult to do simple things like chew your food, talk, and even yawn. Ouch!     What causes TMD? Well, it’s sometimes hard, even for dentists, to figure out the root of the problem. There are a variety of things that can contribute to this disorder, and they include trauma, malocclusion, arthritis, and bruxism (clenching and grinding the teeth), as just a few examples. Is Your Clicking Jaw a Symptom of TMD? If your jaw is clicking but you aren’t experiencing any pain, and you aren’t experiencing any limitations when opening and moving your jaw, it might not be TMD. Even occasional discomfort in the muscles or joint may not be anything serious, and the clicking might come and go as well. That’s good news!    Clicking in your jaw might be mild and temporary, lasting only a little while before going away on its own. If you’re having more severe or ongoing symptoms, however, a more serious issue, or TMD, might be to blame. What Can You Do to Relieve Clicking in the Jaw? There are some things you can try at home to help stop your jaw from clicking and popping. Here are some examples: Avoid chewing gum, and avoid foods that are crunchy, hard, or chewy, as these can all put excess strain on the jaw and make the popping and clicking worse. Take small bites so you don’t have to open your jaw as wide and try to stick with soft foods until your jaw issues resolve. Massaging and stretching the muscles of the face and jaw might help you get rid of the clicking you’re experiencing, but this is best done with the help of a physical therapist, doctor, or dentist. Feeling stressed? Clenching your jaw because you’re tense? Try stress-relieving strategies like deep breathing, meditation, and exercise. You can even make it a point to relax your jaw by keeping a bit of space between your upper and lower teeth.   Remember, if the discomfort you’re feeling persists, or if you notice that you aren’t able to open or close the jaw properly, it’s best to see a dental professional who can pinpoint what’s going wrong with your jaw. Jaw Symptoms? See Your Dentist for Advice! Even though a painless clicking in your jaw might not be anything to worry about, it’s still a great idea to make an appointment with your dentist for a checkup. He or she can examine your jaw and take X-rays to evaluate the health of your temporomandibular joint. If it’s determined that you have TMD, you can start receiving the appropriate treatment to get relief, based on the cause of the problem. Concerned about being able to afford trips to the dentist for symptoms like clicking or popping sounds in your jaw? The right dental insurance can help! Search for the ideal plan on the Direct Benefits Marketplace, where you’ll find comprehensive coverage that will give you peace of mind.              Sources: https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/temporomandibular-disorder/when-a-clicking-jaw-is-a-sign-of-tmd https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/tmj/symptoms-causes/syc-20350941 https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319888#treatment-for-jaw-popping http://www.tmj.org/site/content/tmd-basics    

The Benefits of Fluoride Treatments

The Benefits of Fluoride Treatments

You already know that brushing and flossing daily and seeing your dentist regularly for professional cleanings are smart ways to remove plaque and tartar. By taking these steps to keep your teeth and gums clean, you’re helping to reduce the odds of developing cavities. Great work! But you can do even more to protect your pearly whites. Go beyond brushing with fluoride toothpaste by talking to your dentist about fluoride treatments and the benefits that they can provide.   What are fluoride treatments, and why might you need one? Check out the information below to learn more, but also be sure to chat with your dentist to find out if this option would really be right for you. Would You Benefit from a Fluoride Treatment? When you see your dentist for a checkup, they might be able to determine your level of risk when it comes to cavities. If you have a high or moderate risk of cavities developing, a professional fluoride treatment might be a great preventive measure to take—in addition to following a strict oral hygiene routine at home, of course.  Some factors that may indicate you’re the right type of patient for a fluoride treatment. These include: Weakened enamel, enamel defects, or exposed root surfaces Dry mouth High amounts of bacteria that can cause cavities Poor oral hygiene  Poor diet How Does It Work? You might be wondering why you would need to receive a fluoride treatment in the dentist’s chair if you’re already using toothpaste and mouthwash that contain fluoride. Well, it’s simple: the fluoride that’s used by your dentist will be more highly concentrated, making it even stronger than what you’re getting daily at home through brushing and rinsing.   If your dentist notices the early signs of tooth decay—when you don’t yet have a cavity that requires drilling and filling—treatment that applies strong fluoride directly to a tooth might help prevent the decay from progressing, and might even reverse it! And, in children, fluoride treatments may help prevent decay in those adorable baby teeth, too.   Basically, the fluoride gets to work on rebuilding your enamel. It can do that by helping the teeth absorb calcium and phosphate from your saliva. Fluoride might also get in the way of bacteria that could lead to cavities, making it harder for that bacteria to stick to your teeth and do damage. What to Expect When Getting a Fluoride Treatment Along with helping prevent cavities, the best part about fluoride treatments is that it’s painless and simple – the treatment only takes a few minutes to complete! Here’s how easy it is: your dentist will apply the fluoride, which could be in the form of a gel, a rinse, a foam, or a varnish. They might use a brush, cotton swab, or tray to carefully apply the fluoride to your teeth. After the fluoride is applied, you might be told that you aren’t allowed to drink or eat anything for a certain amount of time, typically about a half-hour, so the solution can get to work strengthening your teeth.     How often do you need to get a fluoride treatment? The answer depends on various factors, and your dentist will decide what’s right for you. Some people might need a fluoride treatment once a year, while others might need one every few months. Fluoride Treatments: Painless, Fast, and Worth Talking to Your Dentist About Overall, fluoride treatments may be an option if you’re at a higher risk of getting cavities, as this simple, painless, and quick treatment might help you avoid the dentist’s drill. Who wouldn’t want that?! If you think that you could benefit from a fluoride treatment, talk to your dentist. And, remember, if you have the right dental insurance, like one of the high-quality plans on the Direct Benefits Marketplace, you can rest assured that you’ll be able to receive the oral health treatments you need without breaking the bank in the process.        Sources: http://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Member%20Center/FIles/patient_72.ashx https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/fluoride/fluoride-treatments https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/327168#benefits https://phys.org/news/2013-05-evidence-fluoride-tooth.html https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/03/14/469959427/no-drill-dentistry-fluoride-treatments-can-prevent-cavities-in-adults https://www.healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/oral-health/Pages/Fluoride-Varnish-What-Parents-Need-to-Know.aspx

Dental Implants vs. Dentures: What You Need to Know

Dental Implants vs. Dentures: What You Need to Know

When it comes to replacing missing teeth, two well-known options are dental implants and dentures. But there are pros and cons associated with each, so before you decide which one of these is best for you, keep reading to learn more about them{...}. What You Need to Know About Dentures Pros Today’s dentures are better than those of the past, and they are a rather simple solution when you need to replace some or all your teeth. They tend to be inexpensive, particularly when compared to dental implants, and you don’t need to undergo an invasive procedure to get them.   The key is to be sure you see a dental professional who will ensure your dentures are made correctly. When they are properly fitted to your unique mouth, they will be less likely to get in the way of your speech or slip out of place. And, in the case of partial dentures, they’ll be less likely to cause infection or tooth decay in nearby teeth. Dentures also might be the ideal option if your jaw or gums aren’t in the best shape and, therefore, would not be able to support implants. Cons One of the drawbacks of dentures is that they are removable, and they might need to be secured into place with a special adhesive. They also need to be cleaned when you take them out of your mouth. Even when in place, dentures might not function like real teeth because they aren’t secured into your jaw. Complete dentures might be uncomfortable, they might make your gums sore, and they might even affect the way you taste food. And when you do things like cough, smile, speak, chew, and yawn, the dentures might even shift or click. Finally, dentures might last up to 15 years, and they may need to be adjusted if your gums and facial structure change as you get older. Therefore, you’ll need to factor in the cost of replacing them whenever necessary. What You Need to Know About Dental Implants Pros You can get a single dental implant, or you can have all of your teeth replaced with implant-supported dentures. Provided that your jaw and gums are healthy enough, dental implants can serve as a long-term solution to missing teeth. With proper care, they might even last a lifetime! Because they’re surgically implanted into the jawbone, implants are more comfortable than dentures. They look and function just like real teeth, so they don’t get in the way of your speech or your ability to chew and taste food. You can even brush and floss them, just like your natural teeth, to keep them clean. Also, unlike dentures, because implants are placed into the jaw to replace tooth roots, the bone will be less likely to deteriorate over time. This can help prevent problems like facial sagging and changes to your smile.   Cons One of the biggest drawbacks of getting a dental implant is the fact that this is a surgical procedure that requires multiple steps. As a result, implants are much more expensive than dentures, typically costing thousands of dollars. You will need to undergo an invasive procedure to get a dental implant. Additional steps, such as having X-rays taken, are necessary, and some patients also need a bone graft as well. The entire process of getting implants is typically completed over the course of several appointments, and you might experience pain along the way.   No Matter What You Decide, the Right Dental Insurance Can Be Really Helpful! Whether you opt for dentures or implants will depend on a variety of factors, including your dentist’s recommendations, but no matter which solution you go with, having dental insurance can put your mind at ease when it comes to paying for these services. Pro tip: Be sure to read the fine print to see if implants are covered if that’s the route you’d like to take to restore your smile. Not all dental insurance policies will help cover their cost.  To find the ideal dental plan to suit your needs and expectations, check out the Direct Benefits Marketplace, where you can easily compare plans and sign up for one whenever you’re ready. Then, you don’t have to worry about breaking the bank if you need dentures or implants! Sources: https://oralb.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/adults/implants-vs-dentures/ https://www.acfdga.com/blog/2018/9/6/should-i-get-dental-implants-or-dentures-heres-your-answer https://www.aaid-implant.org/dental-implants/implants-vs-dentures-and-bridges/ https://www.perio.org/consumer/full-mouth-implants https://forestparkdental.com/dental-implants-vs-dentures-best-2/

Dental Insurance Guide: What to Look For and Consider

Dental Insurance Guide: What to Look For and Consider

Ready to purchase dental insurance? Great! This is a really smart step to take, as oral care can be expensive. The right insurance will help cover the costs so you never have to miss an appointment for a checkup, cleaning, or treatment that will keep your smile bright and beautiful. As you begin shopping for dental insurance, though, you might quickly become overwhelmed. How can you sort through all of your options to find the one that will suit your needs, as well as your budget? We’re here to help with this handy dental insurance guide. Below, we cover the basic things that you should look for in a plan, as well as factors to consider to help you land on the ideal policy for yourself and your family. Details You Should Look for Out-of-pocket costs – In addition to your monthly premium, find out what other out-of-pocket costs you’ll be responsible for. These might include a deductible, co-insurance, and copay.  Annual maximum – A dental insurance plan will only cover up to a certain amount per year, so be sure to check what the annual max is. If you think you need more coverage for various treatments, you’ll want the annual maximum to be higher. Once that maximum number is reached, you’ll have to cover the rest on your own.  Waiting period – Is there a waiting period before the insurance kicks in? If a plan doesn’t have a waiting period, it means you can begin using it right away.  The network – If you want to be able to continue using your current dentist, you’ll want to ensure you can do so. Some dental plans, such as HMO and PPO options, have networks of providers that you must adhere to. Others, such as indemnity plans, will allow you to choose any dentist you want.  Ask Yourself: What’s Covered by Various Dental Plans in Your Area? Not all dental plans will cover the same types of services, and some will be more comprehensive than others.    As you look through the various dental insurance providers that are available in your area, check if their plans cover a wide range of services, such as the following: Preventive and routine care like exams, cleanings, sealants, fluoride treatments Diagnostics like X-Rays Treatments for the gums, such as root planing Fillings, root canals, extractions Crowns, dentures, bridges Dental implants Orthodontics Emergency services Oral surgery Cosmetic procedures like whitening treatments or veneers Note: These services might not be covered 100%. If that’s the case, consider your out-of-pocket costs if you were to seek out these treatments. Other Things to Consider Before Choosing a Plan By now it’s clear that when you’re shopping for dental insurance, you have to look at a lot more than just the monthly premium that you’ll be required to pay. But there’s more. Here are some other things to keep in mind as well: Will the plan cover everything you need for yourself, as well as your spouse and kids if they also need coverage? What level of customer service does the insurance company provide? Is it easy to get in touch with them when you have questions or concerns? Does the policy limit you to the cheapest treatment options available? In other words, if you opt for more expensive treatments, will you still be covered or will you have to pay for those out-of-pocket? Want an Easier Way to Shop? Check out the Direct Benefits Marketplace! Head to the Direct Benefits Marketplace to view the dental plans that are available in your area. You can compare different policies side-by-side to clearly see what they have to offer, and you can get a better picture of what your out-of-pocket costs will be based on the level of coverage that’s provided by each insurer.  Once you start looking at what options are available, you might be surprised by how many choices you have, and how affordable they are. And with the information above, you can take additional steps to rest assured you’ll select the plan that’s just right.          Sources: https://www.dentalplans.com/dental-information/dental-insurance/how-to-choose-dental-insurance https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/dental-health-insurance#1 https://www.ahip.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Guide_to_Dental_Insurance.pdf https://www.investopedia.com/articles/personal-finance/120914/4-important-steps-choosing-dental-insurance.asp http://www.insuranceqna.com/dental-insurance/choosing-a-dental-plan.html

Natural Remedies for Teeth Pain

Natural Remedies for Teeth Pain

Toothaches hurt! And when you have one, you want to get relief fast. But if you're not a fan of using products with synthetic ingredients, you might be in search of natural remedies to try instead. We've got you covered! There are several natural remedies for teeth pain that you can use to reduce the discomfort until you can see your dentist.{...} We've listed a few of them below to help you get started.  Natural Remedies to Try: 1. Apply a Cold Compress to Your Cheek This natural option can be helpful if you have swelling along with a toothache. Just take a cold compress and put it against your cheek for 20 minutes. If you need more relief, wait an additional 20 minutes before reapplying the cold compress to the outside of the cheek. The goal here is to temporarily bring the swelling down, while also numbing the pain in the tooth.  2. Feel Better with Clove Oil or Peppermint Oil Clove oil is a natural pain reliever, but it can also help with swelling. Start by absorbing several drops of clove oil with a cotton ball. Rub it gently over the gums and teeth that are causing discomfort. Just keep in mind that, like other remedies on this list, this one can provide temporary effects, but you might be surprised by how well this oil works.  Another natural way to numb the pain would be by using peppermint oil to get short-term relief. Once again, you can apply it using a cotton ball. Soak up a few drops of peppermint oil with a cotton ball, and then apply it to the painful area in your mouth.   3. Numb the Pain with Peppermint Tea or Black Tea If you don’t have peppermint oil, you can also use peppermint tea. Take a teaspoon of dried peppermint leaves and steep it for 20 minutes in a cup of boiling water. Once it cools down, use this as a rinse by swishing it around in your mouth. You can either swallow it or spit it out.     Don’t have peppermint tea? No problem! Grab some black tea instead, which is also capable of reducing pain and swelling. To make the most of this natural remedy, you’ll need a wet tea bag (warm is most comfortable). Simply put it against the tooth that’s aching to help relieve the discomfort temporarily.  4. Rinse Your Mouth with Salt Water or Hydrogen Peroxide Warm salt water can serve as a pain-relieving mouth rinse when you have a toothache and swelling in the gums. Put anywhere from ½ teaspoon to 2 teaspoons of salt in a cup (8 ounces) of water and swish it around for about 30 seconds before spitting it out. Make sure the water is warm, rather than hot or cold, as that will provide the most relief without causing more discomfort.  Alternatively, you could try rinsing your mouth with hydrogen peroxide to reduce pain and swelling. Mix a small amount of 3% hydrogen peroxide in an equal amount of water before swishing and spitting. Like the salt water rinse, this shouldn’t be swallowed. And, after spitting it out, rinse your mouth a few times with pure water. Have a Toothache? Make an Appointment to See Your Dentist! Toothaches and swollen gums shouldn’t be ignored. If you’re experiencing these symptoms, it’s time for a checkup. So make an appointment with your dentist to figure out what’s going on, and to receive the appropriate treatment that will provide permanent relief.  Worried about affording trips to the dentist? Then consider signing up for one of the many affordable dental insurance plans on the Direct Benefits Marketplace! With the right plan, you’ll receive the financial support you need to keep your teeth and gums strong, healthy, and pain-free.      Sources: https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/home-remedies-toothache https://www.thehealthy.com/dental/home-remedies-for-toothache/ https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/adult-oral-care/4-tooth-pain-home-remedies https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/cavities/four-homemade-toothache-remedies      

How Teeth Change with Age

How Teeth Change with Age

Like all other parts of your body, your teeth will change with age. And, as you get older, you need to be extra diligent when it comes to preventing oral infections, tooth decay, and gum disease. Knowing how your teeth change as you get older and understanding what you can do to keep them as strong and healthy as possible will help you maintain your beautiful smile as you get older.{...} Remember, if you start taking steps today to keep your mouth healthy, you can reduce the odds of needing to replace your natural teeth with dentures or implants in the future.    How Teeth Change as You Get Older Here’s a list of some of the ways that you can expect your chompers to change with each passing year:   • Wear-and-tear takes its toll on your enamel: Years and years of biting and chewing might eventually wear down your enamel, which is the outer layer of the teeth. Even certain foods, such as those that are acidic, could do damage. Also, certain parts of the teeth may become flatter over time. Plus, bruxism (teeth grinding and clenching) and a poor bite might also wreak havoc on the surfaces of your teeth. Bad habits like chewing on hard foods or ice, could make your teeth more susceptible to damage, too.   • Increased sensitivity: As you get older, and your enamel is worn away more and more, or your gums begin to recede, you might start to experience sensitivity, particularly when you eat or drink something cold or hot. If your teeth are sensitive, be sure to see your dentist to rule out problems like gum disease or tooth decay.   • Less sensitivity because of changes in the nerves: Your teeth have nerves inside them, and they might get smaller as you get older. This could make you less sensitive to problems like cavities, so you might end up going a long time with decay eating away at your pearly whites if you don’t see your dentist regularly for checkups. Reduced sensitivity also means that you might not notice if there’s a small break in a tooth that ends up exposing the inner pulp. Your dentist can catch problems in their earliest stages at regular exams and cleanings, so be sure to keep those dental appointments even if you don’t have any symptoms! • Your teeth won’t be as white: As you get older, your teeth may not look as white and bright as they used to. The dentin might become more obvious through the enamel, which can also become stained by what you eat and drink.    The Risk of Problems Increases with Age As you get older, your risk for a variety of oral health problems, from cavities to cancer, increases, and the gums start to recede as well.    Unfortunately, once you’re over 65 years of age, the odds of tooth decay developing and the odds of needing a root canal for severe damage are much higher than when you’re younger.    Additionally, if you have old fillings from many years ago, you’ll need to see your dentist to ensure they aren’t breaking down and decay isn’t occurring along their edges. Your dentist can fix these problems if they arise.    Keep Your Gums Strong to Support the Health of Your Teeth Did you know that gum disease is the main cause of tooth loss in seniors? So, if you want to keep your teeth healthy as you age, it’s important to take great care of your gums, which provide the foundation for your pearly whites.    Brushing, flossing, and professional dental cleanings can help you prevent the buildup of plaque in between teeth and along the gum line. Remember: even if you’re brushing and flossing regularly at home, you might not be getting your teeth as clean as they should be, so professional cleanings in the dentist’s chair can help prevent a minor case of gum disease from becoming worse as you get older.    See your dentist regularly for checkups and let them know if your gums bleed, or if they feel swollen or sore at all. A dental professional will be able to carefully evaluate the health of your gums, looking for areas that might be receding and putting your teeth at risk. Luckily, there are a variety of treatments available to resolve gum disease before it can do serious damage to your teeth.    Have the Right Dental Insurance to Help Cover the Costs of Care! Cleaning your teeth and gums at home, and seeing your dentist for checkups, are important steps during every stage of life, but they become even more important when you’re older. Shopping for the right dental insurance can help put your mind at ease when it comes to affording the professional care you need to keep your smile looking fabulous, no matter your age.    If you’re ready to sign up for a dental plan, check out the Direct Benefits Marketplace to easily compare options that are available in your area.  Sources:   https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/teeth-gums-age#1 https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/the-aging-mouth-and-how-to-keep-it-younger https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/a/aging-and-dental-health    

Beyond the Buzzwords: How to Pick the Best Dental Insurance for Your Needs

Beyond the Buzzwords: How to Pick the Best Dental Insurance for Your Needs

Dental insurance companies want you to buy their plans rather than a competitor's-Not so surprising, is it? But, as you shop for a dental policy, it's important to look beyond buzzwords and focus on the fine print. That way, you'll be able to see what a plan really has to offer, and you can be confident that you're making the right choice after comparing your options{...}.   How can you be sure you’re picking the best dental insurance for your needs? We’ve compiled some tips to help you get started.  Think About Your Current and Future Needs While you can’t predict every dental treatment you’ll need (think: accidentally chipping a tooth) or the costs associated with high-quality care, it is possible to get a general idea of what you and your family will need, both now and in the future.  • Regular checkups are necessary to keep an eye on your oral health. Your dentist can look for early signs of gum disease and cavities, and then you can get less invasive, more affordable treatment.    • Cleanings, too, are a key component to maintaining your oral health for years to come. Brushing and flossing at home every day is great, but it won’t get rid of all the plaque and tartar on your teeth. A dental hygienist knows exactly what to do to clean your teeth to help keep problems at bay.  • Another component of oral health maintenance: getting X-rays. These will allow your doctor to see inside your teeth and determine if there’s any decay or infection.   Beyond routine care, there are many other possibilities to think about, as these will also play a role in determining the type of insurance policy you’ll need. Some examples: • Do you have kids? They might end up needing orthodontics to correct a bite or to straighten their teeth for a perfect smile.  • Are you and your spouse getting older? Did you know that, as you age, your risk of various oral health problems increases? Having a comprehensive dental plan that covers extras like dentures can help put your mind at ease, especially when it comes to affording care while following a strict budget.  • Have you always had problems with your teeth, despite your efforts to brush and floss at home? You might end up needing more fillings, or you might need expensive root canals and crowns at some point in the future.  • If you ever lose one or more teeth due to any reason, replacing missing teeth with bridges and implants is a great way to get your smile back, but these options can be costly without the right insurance.  Evaluate Plans Based on What They Cover Now that you’ve thought about some of your current dental care needs, as well as your potential future needs, you have a clearer idea of what you require from your insurance.  For example, if you don’t have kids or you aren’t planning on having any children, you might decide that you don’t want to spend money on a plan that includes coverage for orthodontics.  Or, if you want to stick with a basic plan to cover routine care because your teeth and gums have always been healthy and strong, you might opt to look for affordable plans that don’t have a lot of extras.   On the other hand, if you’re the type of person who wants the peace of mind that comes with a more complete package that includes even the most expensive treatments (because you never really know what will happen), you’ll know to look for plans that cover it all.  Pro Tip: Not all dentists work with every insurance company or plan. If you have a dentist that you really like, and you don’t want to be forced to switch, ask their office what insurance plans they accept so you can select one that includes your dentist in their network.  Comparing Plans Doesn’t Have to Be Challenging Now that you know how to evaluate your needs to determine what type of dental insurance would be right for you and your family, it’s time to shop!  Remember, when comparing policies, look for information regarding the level of coverage for preventive care (like checkups, cleanings, and X-rays), basic care (like fillings), major care (like bridges, crowns, and implants), and emergency care. Orthodontic care would also be listed as a separate category to look for if you need it.  To begin your search, check out the Direct Benefits Marketplace. You can view dental plans available in your area, and you can narrow down your options to those that are designed for single individuals, kids, and families with or without kids.  On the Direct Benefits Marketplace, you also get to compare several plans side-by-side to see what your out-of-pocket costs will be, and what percentage of coverage you’ll receive in every dental care category. This makes shopping for your specific needs super easy! Get started whenever you’re ready, and before you know it, you’ll have the coverage that can help keep your teeth and gums in tip-top shape.   

How to Reverse Gingivitis

How to Reverse Gingivitis

Gingivitis-characterized by gums that bleed and are swollen, red, and sore-is the earliest stage of gum disease. Even though you might get a little freaked out by this diagnosis, rest assured that it is reversible. You can get your gums back to a state of health rather easily, without the need for expensive treatments. But you do need to put the work in to do it right, and to prevent this condition from progressing into serious gum disease{...}. Below is some information on how to reverse gingivitis, but be sure to work closely with your dentist for personalized guidance on how to heal your gums and keep them strong for years to come.  You Can Tackle Gingivitis at Home First off, whenever you’re experiencing symptoms, it’s best to see your dentist to get answers. If the diagnosis is gingivitis, here are some steps you can take at home every day to reverse it and keep it from coming back: 1.Brush and floss every single day: To keep your pearly whites bright and your gums gingivitis-free, brushing and flossing daily is necessary. There’s no way around it. Brush at least twice a day for two minutes at a time using a manual or electric toothbrush with soft bristles that won’t irritate your gums. Brush along the gum line, and replace your toothbrush regularly. Floss at least once daily with string floss or a water flosser to clean between your teeth. This simple routine can help ensure you remove plaque and bacteria that would otherwise irritate the gums.  Note: When it comes to maintaining gum health, flossing is a must, so don’t forget to do it.  2. Add a mouthwash and/or oil pulling to your routine: In addition to brushing and flossing, your dentist might recommend adding a mouthwash to your routine in order to reverse gingivitis. Ask your dental care provider which type of mouthwash would be best for your needs. Plus, you might want to try oil pulling with coconut, sunflower, or sesame oil, as this simple technique may help reduce plaque that causes gingivitis. 3. Eat a healthy diet that supports gum health: Your oral health can be affected by what you eat, so consuming plenty of foods that are nutrient-dense, while avoiding sugary and starchy foods, is wise. Stick with whole grains, add more fruits and veggies to your diet, and switch to water if you drink a lot of carbonated and sugary beverages.  4. Treat dry mouth: If you’ve been diagnosed with dry mouth, there’s less saliva to help keep bacteria from wreaking havoc on your gums, so it’s wise to take steps to keep your mouth moist. Your dentist can give you tips on how to go about doing so, but you might find relief with simple strategies like chewing sugar-free gum, enjoying sugar-free lozenges, and drinking more water.    5. Quit smoking: Smoking is an unhealthy habit for many reasons, but a lot of people don’t realize that it can also take its toll on your gum health, and make it harder to heal from gingivitis too. Quitting smoking might be your ticket to reversing gingivitis and preventing gum infections.  Your Dentist Can Help! Great oral health includes both home care and professional care, so see your dentist regularly for checkups and professional cleanings, which go a long way in preventing and reversing gingivitis.  Why are professional dental cleanings so important when it comes to reversing gingivitis? It’s pretty simple: tartar isn’t something that you can get rid of on your own, no matter how impeccable your oral hygiene routine is. By getting rid of that tartar buildup, a dental hygienist can help restore the health of your gums.      How often should you see your dentist? Well, experts recommend every six months, but your dentist can tell you whether or not you can go longer between visits or if you need to see him or her more often.  It’s Possible to Reverse Gingivitis and Prevent Future Problems! The ultimate goal is to keep as much plaque, tartar, and bacteria off of your teeth as possible so your gums can remain healthy and strong. And you can do that by following a strict oral hygiene routine at home, while also seeing your dentist regularly.  Experiencing symptoms? See your dentist as soon as possible for a proper diagnosis. If it’s gingivitis, he or she can professionally clean your teeth and give you a plan to follow to get your gums back to a state of health. With consistent effort, it might even only take a couple of weeks to start seeing results. Then, just maintain this routine so you can prevent gingivitis from recurring.   Final Tip: Worried about affording professional dental care? Browse the Direct Benefits Marketplace to find the perfect insurance that can help cover the costs so you never have to skip an appointment, especially when you’re experiencing gum problems.        Sources: https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/gum-disease/reverse-gum-disease-dont-miss-your-window-of-opportunity https://www.waterpik.com/oral-health/edu/gum-disease/how-long-does-gingivitis-take-to-heal/ https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/gingivitis-gum-11#1 https://benefitsbridge.unitedconcordia.com/reversing-gingivitis-7-tips-to-make-it-happen/ https://misuse.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/error/abuse.shtml  

Dental Implants: Costs and Need to Know Information

Dental Implants: Costs and Need to Know Information

Dental implants are great. They look and function just like real teeth, so they are a popular option when it comes to replacing a missing tooth. Unfortunately, dental implants can be pricey. To better understand the costs associated with this procedure, and to access other important information that can help you make the right decision for your dental health, check out the short guide below.{...} How Much Do Dental Implants Cost? The thing about dental implants is that their cost is determined by a variety of factors, such as: Where you are located, and the dental professional you select Whether or not you’ll need to have a tooth extracted first Whether or not you’ll need a bone graft How many dental implants you need The materials used for the implant and crown Because of all of these variables, it’s hard to say exactly how much a dental implant will cost. You can, however, expect that it will be expensive. How expensive?  Well, if you’re just getting one implant to replace a single tooth, it might cost you anywhere from $1,500 to a whopping $6,000. If you’re replacing up to four teeth, your costs might be as high as $10,000. Full mouth dental implants, also known as implant-supported dentures, cost $34,000, on average, though the price might be even higher than that. Why Are Dental Implants So Expensive? Now that we’ve covered the range of prices that you might see when you’re looking into getting dental implants, it’s time to cover why they’re so expensive.  First off, dental implant surgeries need to be performed by trained and experienced professionals. You’ll likely need to make several appointments with the dental surgeon, and you’ll also need to cover the cost of X-rays or a CT scan of your mouth before you even get started. Dental implant surgeries are complex, and involve multiple steps and trips to the dental chair. Generally, those steps include moving through an initial consultation, as well as the procedure to place the implant into the jawbone. You’ll then need to have the abutment placed after the gums heal, and then a permanent crown needs to be set into place. Note: In the event that you don’t have enough bone within your jaw for an implant, a bone graft might be needed, and that will add to the cost of the implant surgery. And if you need to have teeth extracted prior to the surgery, that will also be an additional cost.   Beyond the procedure itself, the implants themselves are expensive because they consist of three components: implant, abutment, and crown. You’ll Need to Get a Personalized Quote Sure, dental implants are expensive, but they’re worth considering if you want to be able to replace your natural teeth with a long-term solution (cared for properly, they might last a lifetime!), and if you don’t want to rely on bridges or dentures. Because implants look just like real teeth, no one will know that you have them. And because they function like real teeth, you can chew and speak naturally and comfortably. Plus, you care for implants just like you do your real teeth (simply brush, floss, and see your hygienist for professional cleanings).   How much this surgery will cost, however, will depend on your unique situation and needs. So the best way to figure out what you’ll have to pay is by seeing a dental professional with experience in placing implants and asking them for a quote.  Dental Insurance Might Be Able to Help Cover the Cost! The good news is that some insurance plans will gladly help cover the cost of dental implants. So if you were worried about being able to afford this procedure, don’t fret. Investing in the right insurance policy might be all that you need to do to be well on your way towards getting the implants that will restore your beautiful smile. Ready to get started? Search through the Direct Benefits Marketplace to quickly and easily sign up for the dental plan that will give you the coverage you need for everything from basic cleanings to major services.    Sources: https://www.authoritydental.org/dental-implants https://www.aaid-implant.org/faq/#265 https://askthedentist.com/dental-implants-cost/ https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/dental-implants#1